Forum 2014: A Keystone Connection

Philadelphia, PA
Wednesday, July 16, 2014
The FORUM program is filled with sessions, tours, workshops, and meetings sure to suit a wide variety of interests and experience levels.  Click on the DETAILS link for each item below for an in-depth description and speaker bios. 

All full registration options (excluding Single Day) include educational sessions, receptions, and certain special events in the base fee.  Tours, workshops, and certain special events are available for an additional cost as indicated and are limited to availability.

Download a Program-at-a-Glance and Schedule Planner to help you design the perfect FORUM experience.

WORKSHOPS AND TOURS ONLY
Just want to attend one of the workshops or tours happening during FORUM and not the full conference?  Beginning June 7 a limited number of spaces remaining in the various tours and workshops will be available to registrants not attending the other conference activities.  Fees for Workshops/tours only will be higher than the conference rate, but discounts may be available for members of various partner organizations.
Select registrant type:
Full Conference
Wednesday July 16  


WORKSHOP
The Historic Preservation Tax Credit: Making Money the Old Fashioned Way (4 remaining)  (details)
Historic Preservation Tax Credits: Making Money the Old Fashioned Way
NOTE:  This workshop will be held at the Le Meridien hotel at 1421 Arch St., NOT the Sheraton University City

This workshop has been approved for 6.5 AIA LUs


Rehabilitation of historic buildings is a key element of sustainable development and economic opportunity for communities, property owners and developers. The federal rehabilitation investment tax credit program (RITC) is a key tool in financing many historic rehabilitation projects. Additionally, more than 30 states offer a state-level tax incentive for preservation projects. 

To assist design professionals in providing relevant services to clients, this program will teach the requirements of the RITC and new state tax credit programs. This course will teach participants the appropriate state and federal agency contacts, basic program requirements, the process of program application and project design considerations. Workshop participants will also learn fundamental aspects of federal and state tax considerations of the RITC from the perspective of developers and tax professionals. The presenters will use case studies from actual tax credit projects, including the Nugent Home for Baptists project in Philadelphia by Nolen Properties that combined low income housing and historic tax credits.

Photo: The restored Nugent Home for Baptists in the Mount Airy neighborhood of Philadelphia.  Photo courtesy of the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia.

Speakers:
Scott Doyle, Chief, Grants, Markers & Tax Credits Division, Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission
Karen Arnold, Tax Credit Reviewer, Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission
Cindy Hamilton, Vice President, Heritage Consulting Group
James Nolen, Nolen Properties
Harold Berk, Esq.
Jerry Roller, JKR Partners, LLC
Rebecca Shiffer, National Park Service
Audrey Tepper, National Park Service
Joel Cohn, Partner, Cohn-Reznick
Macy Kisilinksy, PNC Real Estate


Location:
Le Meridien, 1421 Arch St.

Historic Preservation Tax Credits were a major piece of the financing for the conversion of the 1912 YMCA building to Le Meridien in 2010.  Standing opposite City Hall and within sight of the Masonic Temple and Arch Street United Methodist Church, the building was designed by renowned Philadelphia architect Horace Trumbauer and is a contributing building to the Broad Street Historic District.  The workshop will be in the Abele Library, named for Julian Abele, a prominent African-American architect and the principal designer in Trumbauer's firm. 
Add to calendarWednesday, July 16, 2014 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: 1421 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA
$65.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
Using 3D Scanning for Historic Structure Recordation and Preservation (0 remaining)  (details)

Laser 3D Scanning for Preservation and Recordation of Historic Structures and Landscapes
AIA CE: 6 LU

This workshop will provide participants with hands-on introduction to the use of the Leica Scanstation C10 Laser Scanner for structure recordation and related processing software. The first half of the workshop will be spent recording the William Hill Moore  Monument at The Woodlands, which because of its height is difficult to document using traditional methods.  Moore was an undertaker and one of the founders of the Woodlands Cemetery.  He directed the funerals of Presidents Harrison, Taylor, and John Quincy Adams.  During the afternoon session, participants will be introduced to data processing and production of 3D images.

The Leica ScanStation C10 is a rapid, non-contact, accurate method for digital documentation of the as-built environment ranging from urban streetscapes and historic structures to archaeological sites and terrain.  It is the most effective type of 3D scanner, a pulsed scanner, in a compact, platform.  The ability of researchers to use 3D scanning to discover previously unknown sites and artifacts, as well as to document historically significant existing structures, sites, and artifacts provides a valuable archival resource for many fields. 3D scanning is able to collect an abundance of data that once it is entered into a computer can then be analyzed both much more quickly than in traditional ways and in newer and more nuanced ways.  The Leica ScanStation C10 can be used to rapidly create high quality mapped  3D images of structures and landscapes.

NOTE:  This workshop includes lunch.

Instructors:
Beverly Chiarulli, Ph.D.
Dr. Beverly Chiarulli, Retired Director IUP Archaeological Services, joined IUP Archaeological Services 15 years ago after spending the previous eight years with the Bureau of Historic Preservation (the Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Office) of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. As formerly the Director of Archaeological Services, she has received more than 100 external contracts from agencies such as the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, National Park Service, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Allegheny National Forest, US Army Corps of Engineers, and the National Center for Preservation Training and Technology as well as local municipalities, counties, and engineering firms.

Ben Ford, Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Ben Ford is an Assistant Professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania specializing in historical and maritime archaeology, and cultural resource management. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Texas A&M University through the Nautical Archaeology Program.  Dr. Ford has extensive experience in applied archaeology, working for the public and private sectors. He is currently analyzing the 18th Revolutionary War-era site of Hanna’s Town. He was a co-PI on the grant to acquire the ScanStation and is developing a technique using the instrument to monitor structural deterioration.

Marion Smeltzer, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Ms. Marion Smeltzer is a graduate student enrolled in the Indiana University of Pennsylvania MA in Applied Archaeology program. She is currently working with the Leica 3D Scanstation to create virtual landscapes for historic sites and structures.

About the Location:

The Woodlands in Philadelphia, the former country seat of William Hamilton, offers the public one of the nation's most architecturally sophisticated neoclassical houses from the years following the American Revolution. Its Schuylkill River site, originally located beyond the western edge of the city, was reshaped by Hamilton in 1786 to reflect contemporary English picturesque landscape and horticultural ideals.

In 1840, local investors purchased the intact core of the estate to transform the grounds into a rural cemetery. Still active today, Woodlands Cemetery retains two of Hamilton's 18th-century buildings, elaborate Victorian funerary monuments, curving green contours and majestic trees. This park-like setting was named a National Historic Landmark District in 2006 and provides an oasis of nature amid the bustling University City neighborhood.


Add to calendarWednesday, July 16, 2014 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: The Woodlands
$35.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
CRM in Independence National Historical Park
Urban Landscapes
 (1 remaining)  (details)
Cultural Resource Management at Independence National Historical Park:
Urban Landscapes


Spend time with Cultural Resources Management staff from Independence National Historical Park and see some of their challenges and successes. Many of today’s standard methods used in various historic preservation disciplines were developed at Independence. Since its establishment in 1948, Independence and the neighborhood surrounding it have grown from a densely-built amalgam of light industrial, wholesale and working-class, residential multi-family buildings into a prime tourist destination surrounded by expensive homes and upscale service businesses. The park includes a World Heritage Site, six national Historic landmarks, significant landscapes and modern architecture as well as important museum collections.

Urban Landscapes
Explore Independence’s evolution as a cultural landscape. While the park is a recent creation in Philadelphia’s history, it contains historic landscapes, 20th century colonial revival landscapes, recent innovative interpretive landscapes, and the redevelopment of 3 city blocks. Join the park’s landscape architects for tours and discussion.

NOTE: This workshop will take occur outside and participants should dress comfortably and take all necessary health precautions to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.


Workshop Leader:

Susan Edens, Historic Landscape Architect, Independence National Historical Park
Susan Edens is a historic landscape architect at Independence National Historical Park.  She oversaw the current installation of Independence Mall.  She was the project manager for the rehabilitation of the historic cultural landscape on Independence Square.  She was the park's liaison with the City of Philadelphia during their final rehabilitation of Washington Square and also oversaw the preparation of the cultural landscape report for that site.  In addition, Ms. Edens has helped return several of the park's landscapes to their original planting plans and documented the lighting features.  She has a Master's of Landscape Architecture from the University of Virginia.

Presented by:

Add to calendarWednesday, July 16, 2014 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Independence National Historical Park
$10.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
CRM in Independence National Historical Park
Civic Engagement and Traditional Groups (4 remaining)  (details)
Spend time with Cultural Resources Management staff from Independence National Historical Park and see some of their challenges and successes. Many of today’s standard methods used in various historic preservation disciplines were developed at Independence. Since its establishment in 1948, Independence and the neighborhood surrounding it have grown from a densely-built amalgam of light industrial, wholesale and working-class, residential multi-family buildings into a prime tourist destination surrounded by expensive homes and upscale service businesses. The park includes a World Heritage Site, six national Historic landmarks, significant landscapes and modern architecture as well as important museum collections.

Civic Engagement and Traditional Groups
This tour will focus on the park’s use of civic engagement to maintain relationships with specific audiences, and the management of traditionally associated groups through our Ethnography program. We will visit sites of significance to particular groups and discuss how the park facilitates their ceremonial activities. We’ll also discuss the park’s use of civic engagement to promote inclusion on three interpretive projects: the Liberty Bell Center, the President’s House site, and the James Dexter house site as well as two park gardens.

NOTE: This workshop will take occur outside and participants should dress comfortably and take all necessary health precautions to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.

Photo: Visitors viewing the exhibit in the Liberty Bell Center.

Workshop Leader:
Doris Devine Fanelli, Chief, Cultural Resources Management, Independence National Historical Park

Doris Devine Fanelli is the Chief of Cultural Resources Management at Independence National Historical Park.  In that capacity, she manages a division that is responsible for the care of the park’s collections including its archives and a small library, the compliance, history, archaeology and ethnography programs.  She is also the park’s ethnographer overseeing a program that identifies and consults with federally-recognized Native American tribes and other groups who hold traditional associations to park sites.  With a specialization in material culture and a background in curatorship, she has written the furnishings studies for the Declaration House, the Deshler Morris House and Benjamin Franklin Bache’s Aurora subscription office in Franklin Court and co-author of the history and catalog of the park’s portrait collection .  She has also participated on the exhibition planning teams of the Liberty Bell Center, the President’s House Site and the redesigned Franklin Court underground museum.  She has been employed with the National Park Service for thirty-five years and has also held adjunct teaching positions at local schools.  She is a graduate of Indiana University (Ph.D., Folklore with additional certificate in American Studies [fellowship]); University of Delaware (M.A., Winterthur Program in Early American Culture [fellowship]) and Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science (B.S., textile design).

Presented by:

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Independence National Historical Park
$10.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
CRM in Independence National Historical Park
Historic Architecture
 (0 remaining)  (details)
Cultural Resource Management at Independence National Historical Park
Architecture


Spend time with Cultural Resources Management staff from Independence National Historical Park and see some of their challenges and successes. Many of today’s standard methods used in various historic preservation disciplines were developed at Independence. Since its establishment in 1948, Independence and the neighborhood surrounding it have grown from a densely-built amalgam of light industrial, wholesale and working-class, residential multi-family buildings into a prime tourist destination surrounded by expensive homes and upscale service businesses. The park includes a World Heritage Site, six national Historic landmarks, significant landscapes and modern architecture as well as important museum collections.

Historic Architecture
Take a walking tour with the park’s chief architect and examine some of the park’s preservation challenges. See the park’s rich collection of historic structures that range from Independence Hall to Robert Venturi’s ghost structure in Franklin Court.

NOTE: This workshop will take occur outside and participants should dress comfortably and take all necessary health precautions to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.


Workshop Leader:
Charles Tonetti, Senior Historical Architect, Independence National Historical Park
Charles Tonetti is Senior Historical Architect at Independence National Historical Park.  Among his many projects during the past 15 years are the restoration of the tower of Independence Hall and the conservation of exterior stone on William Strickland’s Merchants’ Exchange and Second Bank of the United States buildings.    Prior to working with the National Park Service, Mr. Tonetti’s public service was as Assistant Director of the Architecture Division of the Texas Historical Commission and Preservation Architect with the Historic District Landmarks Commission of New Orleans.   Historic preservation work for private firms has included  Belmont Hall, Smyrna, Delaware; Jerusalem Mill, Gunpowder Falls State Park, Maryland; Homewood House, Baltimore, Maryland; The Old Barracks Museum, Trenton, NJ; Ebenezer Hinsdale Williams House, Historic Deerfield; Abraham Van Wyke House, East Fishkill, NY; and Blair House, Washington, D.C.  He is an officer with the local chapter of the Association for Preservation Technology.

Presented by:

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Independence National Historical Park
$10.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
CRM in Independence National Historical Park
Historical Archaeology (4 remaining)  (details)
Cultural Resource Management at Independence National Historical Park - Historical Archaeology

Spend time with Cultural Resources Management staff from Independence National Historical Park and see some of their challenges and successes. Many of today’s standard methods used in various historic preservation disciplines were developed at Independence. Since its establishment in 1948, Independence and the neighborhood surrounding it have grown from a densely-built amalgam of light industrial, wholesale and working-class, residential multi-family buildings into a prime tourist destination surrounded by expensive homes and upscale service businesses. The park includes a World Heritage Site, six national Historic landmarks, significant landscapes and modern architecture as well as important museum collections.

Historical Archaeology
With the Park historical archeologist, discuss the history of Archeology at Independence and visit a selection of sites where it is interpreted.

NOTE: This workshop will take occur outside and participants should dress comfortably and take all necessary health precautions to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.
Photo: The President's House excavation site by Zito van Dijk.  Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Workshop Leader:
Jed Levin, Chief, History Branch, Independence National Historical Park
Jed Levin has been employed by the National Park Service since 1988. During that time he has served as a staff archeologist with the National Park Service’s Denver Service Center and with the Northeast Region. Since January, 2010, he has served as Chief of the History Branch at Independence National Historical Park.   Mr. Levin’s duties have included all aspects of planning, budgeting, management and execution of numerous archeological projects, as well as management of the park history program and the coordinator of legislative compliance at Independence Park. Jed Levin received his undergraduate training in archeology at the City College of New York. He went on complete postgraduate study at the City University of New York Graduate Center and the University of Pennsylvania, where he was awarded an MA in Historical Archeology in 2001.

Presented by:

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Independence National Historical Park
$10.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
Cultural Resource Management in Independence National Historical Park
Architectural Study Collection (5 remaining)  (details)
Cultural Resource Management at Independence National Historical Park
Architectural Study Collection


Spend time with Cultural Resources Management staff from Independence National Historical Park and see some of their challenges and successes. Many of today’s standard methods used in various historic preservation disciplines were developed at Independence. Since its establishment in 1948, Independence and the neighborhood surrounding it have grown from a densely-built amalgam of light industrial, wholesale and working-class, residential multi-family buildings into a prime tourist destination surrounded by expensive homes and upscale service businesses. The park includes a World Heritage Site, six national Historic landmarks, significant landscapes and modern architecture as well as important museum collections.

Architectural Study Collection
Independence has one of the oldest and most extensive collections of architectural fragments in America. Historic architects began the collection in order to study the many details required to restore the park’s historic structures. Today, preservation architects and students from throughout the mid-Atlantic region turn to the collection for research and instruction. Join the park's chief curator for a presentation that includes discussion and display of several artifacts from the collection.

NOTE: This workshop will take occur outside and participants should dress comfortably and take all necessary health precautions to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.

Workshop Leader:
Karie Diethorn, Chief, Museum Branch, Independence National Historical Park

Karie Diethorn is Senior Curator and Chief of Museum Branch, Independence National Historical Park.  She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and medieval studies from Penn State University and a Masters degree in American history and a certificate in museum studies from the University of Delaware.  She served as the curatorial intern at Independence National Historical Park and then as curator of collections at Old Economy Village, a component of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.  She joined the National Park Service in 1988 as curator of the Longfellow National Historic Site and the John F. Kennedy National Historic Site near Boston.  The following year, she rejoined the staff at Independence National Historical Park as a staff curator.  Since 1994, she has managed Independence Park’s museum operation as chief curator.

Presented by:

Add to calendarWednesday, July 16, 2014 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Independence National Historical Park
$10.00

WORKSHOP
Cultural Resources Essentials - Forum (16 remaining)  (details)

Cultural Resources Essentials - Forum

Forum is the final workshop in PHMC's Cultural Resource Essentials series, during which participants tackle issues similar to those faced by the State Historic Preservation Office. Participants draw from all they’ve learned in the first three modules to determine how to respond to diverse historic properties, projects, and (sometimes) problems.  In the current format, small groups work on resolving a variety of cultural resource and planning issues surrounding a fictitious transportation project in Centre County. The goal is to have participants understand the role of agencies, the SHPO office, and various interested parties with respect to local, state, and federal historic preservation programs.  Everyone has an important role to play. 

NOTE:  Participants in this workshop should have completed at least 2 of the other workshops in the CRE Series - Basics, Applications or Best Practices.

About Cultural Resource Essentials
The Cultural Resources Essentials (CRE) four-part series was launched in 2008. The program is designed to bring consultants, planners, and representatives from CLG communities together with the Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Office’s staff in an effort to collaborate, learn from each other, and determine ways in which federal, state and local programs can intersect to help Pennsylvania’s communities preserve their historic places. Participants who complete the series earn a certificate and are listed on the PHMC BHP webpage, and those in private practice are recognized on the SHPO’s consultant lists.

Moderator:
Andrea L. MacDonald, Chief, Preservation Services Division, Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission
Andrea MacDonald manages the Preservation Services Division at the Pennsylvania SHPO. Her staff administers the state’s National Register and CLG programs, historic property survey, and local community assistance. In recent years, she has coordinated her colleagues’ efforts to conduct the agency’s Cultural Resources Essentials workshop series. MacDonald previously worked as a Preservation Planner in Georgia, providing technical assistance to local governments in a 10-county region. She graduated from Ball State University’s Historic Preservation Program and has a B.S. in Urban and Regional Planning from Michigan State.

Presented by:


Add to calendarWednesday, July 16, 2014 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Fairmount
$25.00

WORKSHOP
Who Can We Go To? Tapping Community Funding Resources for the Care of Historic Religious Buildings  (details)
Who Can We Go To? – Tapping Community Funding Resources for the Care of Historic Religious Buildings
AIA CE: 2 LU

As an architect or historic preservation professional, you’ve worked together with a church, congregation or synagogue to plan the project – but now it’s stalled because of lack of funding.  This workshop will focus on understanding how you can best help a congregation pursue a project by seeking funding from outside as well as inside the congregation.  This presentation describes the unique approach Partners for Sacred Places has developed to Capital Campaigns that invite those other than members of the congregation to support their projects.

Presenters

A. Robert Jaeger, President - Partners for Sacred Places
Bob holds a Master’s degree in preservation planning from Cornell University and an MBA from the University of Michigan. Prior to co-founding Partners for Sacred Places in 1989, Bob worked with the Philadelphia Historic Preservation Corporation as Senior Vice President for the Historic Religious Properties Program. He is the co-author of Sacred Places at Risk (1998) and Strategies for Stewardship and Active Use of Older and Historic Religious Properties (1996), author of Sacred Places in Transition (1994), and editor (from 1985 to 1989) of Inspired, a bi-monthly magazine with news and technical articles on religious property preservation.

Gianfranco Grande, Senior Vice President - Partner for Sacred Places
Gianfranco brings over ten years of experience in development and management of nonprofit organizations, from startups to agencies with annual budgets exceeding $45 million. He served as Principal of Philantropia, Ltd., Executive Director and President of First Step Foundation, and Vice President of Notre Dame High School. A graduate in literature and philosophy from the University of Rome, Gianfranco worked for many years as the foreign editor at a major Italian magazine, and he has published several works of fiction and nonfiction. He is Chairman of the Board for the “Education Center,” a nonprofit organization in the Greater Chicago area, as well he a founding board member of the Linardakis Foundation. Gianfranco is also a member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Chicago Chapter.

Presented by:

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: University 2
$25.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
Repointing Historic Masonry (1 remaining)  (details)
Historic Masonry Workshop: Repointing
AIA CE: 2 LU HSW

Repointing projects are among the most frequently performed maintenance on historic masonry buildings. Repointing a building can prevent unwanted moisture infiltration and prolong the performance of the building, however if an inappropriate mortar is used, the building can be put at risk. This will be a demonstration and hands‐on workshop focusing on understanding the basic properties of historic mortar based on the type of associated masonry and proper material and methods for repointing historic masonry walls. Demonstration and hands‐on session will be taught by Instructors from the International Masonry Institute and Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers. Discussion will focus on ways to analyze historic mortar and selecting appropriate repair materials. The demonstration component will provide the participant with an understanding of proper methods for repointing a historic masonry wall as well as aesthetic aspects of a mortar (color and tooling). Participants will have the opportunity to mix mortar and repoint sections of historic masonry walls.

Instructors:
Roy Ingraffia, Director of Industry Development and Technical Services, International Masonry Institute
Roy is Director of Industry Development and Technical Services for the International Masonry Institute (IMI) and an Architectural Conservator with experience in both design and contracting capacities. His professional work has primarily focused on the preservation of historic masonry structures through research of traditional materials and methods and development of contemporary restoration techniques. In addition to his work with IMI, Roy teaches the Masonry Conservation Seminar within the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works and serves on the board of many local and national preservation organizations.

Mike Kassman, National Safety Director, International Masonry Institute

Michael Kassman, IMI National Safety Director, is a third generation mason with over twenty years trade experience in masonry restoration. He holds a Master’s Degree in Historic Preservation and a Dual Bachelor’s Degree in Health and Safety and Education. Mike is certified as a Construction Health and Safety Technician (CHST) and is recognized by Region #3 as an Outreach Master Safety Trainer.

Scott Ferris, Mason and IMI Trainer

About the Location:

The Woodlands in Philadelphia, the former country seat of William Hamilton, offers the public one of the nation's most architecturally sophisticated neoclassical houses from the years following the American Revolution. Its Schuylkill River site, originally located beyond the western edge of the city, was reshaped by Hamilton in 1786 to reflect contemporary English picturesque landscape and horticultural ideals.

In 1840, local investors purchased the intact core of the estate to transform the grounds into a rural cemetery. Still active today, Woodlands Cemetery retains two of Hamilton's 18th-century buildings, elaborate Victorian funerary monuments, curving green contours and majestic trees. This park-like setting was named a National Historic Landmark District in 2006 and provides an oasis of nature amid the bustling University City neighborhood.


Wednesday, July 16, 2014 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: The Woodlands
$25.00

WALKING TOUR
University of Pennsylvania Campus
 (0 remaining)  (details)
University of Pennsylvania Campus Walking Tour
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

Stroll the campus of one of the country's most prestigious Ivy League schools. See old and new buildings designed by such notable American architects as Horace Trumbauer, Cope & Stewardson, Frank Furness, Louis Kahn, and Venturi Scott Brown. Hear about campus planning and the neighborhood's revitalization and enjoy the University's award-winning landscape.

Presented by:

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM (Eastern Time)
$10.00


MEETING
PennDOT Cultural Resources Staff Meeting  
Wednesday, July 16, 2014 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Eastern Time)

MEETING
NAPC CAMP Train-the-Trainers
By Invitation Only  
Wednesday, July 16, 2014 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)

Thursday July 17  


SPECIAL EVENT
Welcome Reception
Thursday July 17, 4:30-6:00  (details)
Welcome Reception

Join FORUM's presenting partners and sponsors for a networking and social event to kick off a great conference.  If you're new to FORUM, join NAPC President Esther Hall for an introduction to the conference program and some tips on how to get the most out of your experience.  Light refreshments and a cash bar will be available.
Location: Exhibit Hall

SPECIAL EVENT
The Multiple Levels of Value of Historic Religious Properties
 (details)
The Multiple Values of Historic Religious Properties

We are used to thinking of the aesthetic value of sacred places, their contributions to the streetscape, and their importance to historic preservation schemes and heritage tourism. But what about the economic value of a healthy, fully utilized religious property? Congregations contribute greatly to the local and regional economy through their programs and ministries. Once this 'Halo Effect' is calculated, a congregation is in a much better position to advocate for increased funding, strengthening community connections, and building long-term sustainability.  Participants will hear about Partners' work over the past 15 years to help congregations quantify their economic value to the larger community, and also have an opportunity to see how one historic religious building in West Philadelphia has become a home to local community associations, refugee groups, Twelve Step programs, the historic preservation society, art and cultural activities, music series, theater, peace and social justice organizations, educational classes, and several religious congregations.

This program is sponsored by Partners for Sacred Places and will be held at the Calvary Center for Culture and Community in West Philadelphia.  Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church was built in 1906-07 from designs by William R. Brown and the firm of Gillespie & Carrel and is one of the great success stories of how religious properties can find renewed life as hubs for community organizations.  This event is free and open to the public.

Speakers

John Dilulio, Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion, and Civil Society, Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, and Vice-Chair of the Board of Trustees, Partners for Sacred Places
John J. DiIulio, Jr. directs Penn’s Robert A. Fox Leadership Program (Fox) and Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS), and serves as chairman of the Penn Chaplain’s Office Advisory Board. He taught at Harvard and spent thirteen years as Professor of Politics and Public Affairs at Princeton University, directing its first domestic policy research center and the largest Masters in Public Affairs concentration within Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Outside academic life, he has advised presidential candidates in both parties and served as first director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives; served on several bipartisan government reform bodies; and served on the boards of numerous national and local nonprofit organizations.

A. Robert Jaeger, President - Partners for Sacred Places
Bob holds a Master’s degree in preservation planning from Cornell University and an MBA from the University of Michigan. Prior to co-founding Partners for Sacred Places in 1989, Bob worked with the Philadelphia Historic Preservation Corporation as Senior Vice President for the Historic Religious Properties Program. He is the co-author of Sacred Places at Risk (1998) and Strategies for Stewardship and Active Use of Older and Historic Religious Properties (1996), author of Sacred Places in Transition (1994), and editor (from 1985 to 1989) of Inspired, a bi-monthly magazine with news and technical articles on religious property preservation.

Rachel Hildebrandt, Program Manager, Partners for Sacred Places
Rachel holds an M.S. in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. in Psychology from Chestnut Hill College. Before beginning work at Partners, she co-authored two books, The Philadelphia Area Architecture of Horace Trumbauer (2009) and Oak Lane, Olney, and Logan (2011), both published by Arcadia Publishing. She continues to write as a freelance contributor for Philadelphia’s Hidden City Daily web magazine.

Rich Kirk, Board Member - Calvary Center for Culture and Community


Sponsored by

Thursday, July 17, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Calvary Center for Culture and Community

SPECIAL EVENT
Historic Bridge Advocacy: Film Premier and Panel Discussion  (details)
Historic Bridge Advocacy: Film Premier and Discussion Panel

In recent years issues surrounding the nation’s aging and deteriorating transportation infrastructure have become ever more present in public policy and funding discussions.  In Pennsylvania, bridges are an especially important component of the Commonwealth’s transportation network.  However, the structures that some see as outmoded may also have historical significance because of their innovative design, rarity, or place within the community.  How these values are accounted for in the decisions that are being made about the future of these resources often depends on how effectively local organizations communicate with government agencies.      

Attend the premier of Pennsylvania's Historic Bridges: Connecting Our Past and Our Future, a new documentary film about historic bridge advocacy produced by FHWA, PennDOT, and PHMC. The film highlights public advocacy efforts, both successful and unsuccessful, for several Section 106 bridge projects across the state. Following the film premier enjoy a panel discussion with state and federal agency representatives and local advocates on how agency public outreach can better support successful advocacy for historic resources.

Moderator:
Bill Callahan, Community Preservation Coordinator, Western PA, Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission

Panel Participants:
Barbara Frederick, Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission

Barbara Shaffer, Federal Highway Administration

Monica Harrower, PennDOT

Kathryn Auerbach, Bucks County

Donna Holdorf, National Road Heritage Corridor


Sponsored by:

         




Add to calendarThursday, July 17, 2014 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM (Eastern Time)

SPECIAL EVENT
Center City Treasure Hunt (5 remaining)  (details)
Center City Treasure Hunt

Looking to explore Philadelphia in a new way?  Want to mix it up with other conference goers in a fun and casual environment?  Think walking tour meets pub quiz with a healthy dose of sideshow. With only a map and some clues, you and your team of 4-6 people must find a pathway through the giant game board that is Center City Philadelphia. You are guaranteed to see the city in a new light. Plus, it’s a contest with actual prizes. Imagine that, a neighborhood tour you can WIN!

The Treasure Hunt will depart from the conference hotel and end at an undisclosed location elsewhere in the City (don't worry - you'll be able to get back home) where you can enjoy some food, drinks, and prizes.

NOTE:  This event involves extensive travel on foot, so please dress accordingly and take all necessary health precautions to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience. 
Photo by G. Widman for Visit Philadelphia

Tour Leader:
Benjamin Cromie, AICP
Benjamin Cromie is a professional planner by day and tour and treasure hunt guide by night.  Together with his brother, Cromie has led treasure hunts for numerous planning, art, and architecture organizations, including the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, University of Pennsylvania, and Campus Philly.
Thursday, July 17, 2014 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM (Eastern Time)
$40.00


WORKSHOP
Commission Short Course (0 remaining)  (details)
Commission Short Course
AIA CE: 5.5 LU

High level, intensive training for commission members and staff, the Commission Short course includes preservation law, meeting procedures, local designation, the design review process, public outreach, and more. Some of the field’s leading preservationists will get you up to speed on the who, what, when and where of the commission operation. Great for first-time commissioners and staff or veterans who want a refresher course.

NOTE:  A catered lunch is included with registration for this workshop.

Presented by:

Add to calendarThursday, July 17, 2014 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)
$75.00

WORKSHOP
Commission Chair Training (0 remaining)  (details)
Commission Chair Training
AIA CE: 5.5 LU

Designed specifically for current and future commission chairs and staff, Commission Chair Training is a full day intensive workshop including: leadership techniques, working with staff, thorny legal and ethical issues, resolving conflict, partnering with other commissions and organizations, program review, updating guidelines and other topics. Experienced trainers from preservation’s front lines will make sure you have the training you need to lead
your commission.

NOTE: A catered lunch is included with the registration for this workshop.

Presented by:


Thursday, July 17, 2014 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)
$75.00

WORKSHOP
Commission Staff Training (1 remaining)  (details)
Commission Staff Training
AIA CE: 3 LU

Are you new to staffing a commission?  This is the session for you.  Learn how to deal with multiple "bosses", provide excellent customer service, partner with other city departments, and better communicate with applicants.  Our experienced trainers will prepare you to get through some of those crazy days.

Presented by:

Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM (Eastern Time)
$35.00

WORKSHOP
Repairing Historic Wooden Windows (0 remaining)  (details)
Workshop:  Repairing Historic Wooden Windows
AIA CE: 2 LU

Windows are a particularly important defining feature of architectural style. Rarely do we describe a building without reference to the type of window and its placement on the elevations of the house.  Yet the repair and replacement of historic windows is often one of the most challenging issues that preservation commissions and review board are confronted with.  Learn how historic wood windows are assembled, how to describe their parts, and how to repair,  reglaze and weatherize  from experienced conservators and contractors.  Workshop participants will have the chance to practice simple repair techniques under the direction of the staff from the Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust.

Workshop Instructors
Ray Tschoepe, Director of Conservation, Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust
Ray Tschoepe grew up in Philadelphia and attended the University of Pennsylvania as an undergraduate. After spending a number of years in medicine as both a researcher and scientific illustrator, he returned to Penn and was graduated from the Master’s program in Historic Preservation. Mr. Tschoepe worked for almost 10 years as an independent restoration contractor before joining the staff of the Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust in the summer of 2000. As the Trust’s Director of Conservation, he leads a talented staff of conservators and apprentices in architectural conservation projects throughout the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Mr. Tschoepe is a longtime member of the adjunct faculty of the historic preservation program of Bucks Co. Community College where he teaches a core course in Building Conservation. He lectures at conferences and workshops throughout the country and was recently appointed to the position of contributing editor for the Old House Journal. Mr. Tschoepe also serves as Chair of North Wales HARB.

Lucy Strackhouse, Executive Director, Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust
Lucy Strackhouse has been Executive Director of the Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust since 2006 and has served in various capacities at the Trust since 2002. Ms. Strackhouse holds an anthropology degree from Penn State University and a historic preservation certificate from Bucks County Community College. Significant projects include the leasing, restoration and adaptive reuse of Ohio House, one of two buildings remaining from the Centennial Exhibition, the leasing of Bathey House for use as a café, and the leasing of Allen’s Lane Art Center. Prior to 2001, Ms Strackhouse voluntarily served as Chair of Heritage Markham, a historic architecture review board in Markham, Canada. Board and committee positions include; Abington Township Planning Commission, Lower Moreland’s HARB, the Friends of Lemon Hill, the Preservation Alliance Old House Fair Committee and the Abington Orthodox Meeting House Restoration Committee.

Sponsored by:
    

Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Hawthorne Hall, 3849 Lancaster Ave.
$25.00

MOBILE WORKSHOP
Digging the Past: Interpreting Urban Archaeology Along I-95 (5 remaining)  (details)
Digging The Past: Interpreting Urban Archaeology Along I-95

On behalf of PennDOT District 6-0 and the Federal Highway Administration, URS Corporation is currently conducting archaeological investigations along a three-mile long section of Interstate 95, along the Delaware River in Philadelphia.  At this time, excavations are ongoing within the Kensington-Fishtown and Port Richmond neighborhoods, and have revealed intact sites dating from the Middle Archaic Period (ca. 3500 B.C.) through the early 20th century.  In addition to nine Native American occupations, these investigations have identified and documented multiple 18th and 19th century residential sites associated with the working class people who populated the Delaware waterfront, portions of the former Aramingo Canal (1847-1902), and important industrial complexes such as the Dyottville Glassworks.  Among the artifacts so far collected, a large proportion relates directly to the historically significant glass industry established in these neighborhoods during the late 18th and 19th centuries, and includes a wide variety of both standard production and whimsical artifacts made by the craftsmen of the Philadelphia, Kensington, Dyottville, Union, Eagle, and other nearby glass houses.

This field trip will involve an opportunity to view a substantial, museum quality exhibit of artifacts recovered from the I-95 excavations.  The exhibit will be hosted in the historic First Presbyterian Church in Kensington (built 1859) and will emphasize the domestic and glass industry related collections that have been so far recovered.  Additional interpretive materials will highlight some of the most important sites identified and the broad range of features that have been documented.  URS archaeologists will be on hand to interact with members of the tour and to answer questions.  If possible, the tour may also include a visit to one of the ongoing site excavations.

Tour Leader:
Doug Mooney, Senior Archaeologist, URS Corporation
Doug Mooney is a Senior Arhcaeologist at URS Corporation in Burlington, New Jersey and has been employed in contract archaeology since 1987 when he graduated from West Virginia University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in anthropology. He received a Master of Arts degree in archaeology from Penn State in 1994. Over the years Doug has worked for many of the major archaeology firms in this part of the country, including John Milner Associates, Inc., Lantz Research, Inc., 3-D Environmental Services, Inc., Greenhorne and O’Mara, Inc., Kittatinny Archaeological Research, Inc., KCI Technologies, Inc., and Kise Straw & Kolodner, Inc. He currently works for URS Corporation, where he is employed as a senior archaeologist. Doug is also the President of the Philadelphia Archaeological Forum.


Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:00 PM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
$25.00

WORKSHOP
PennDOT Section 106 Training  (details)
Section 106 Principles and Practice
2 Day Workshop - Thursday July 17 and Friday July 18, 8:30AM-4:30PM

This workshop addresses compliance with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act plus an in-depth analysis of key issues such as tribal consultation, coordination with the National Environmental Policy Act, using agreement documents, and strategies for avoiding common problems.

Note:  This workshop is intended for PennDOT staff and business partners.  Registration is available only through the PennDOT Training Calendar at http://www.dotdom1.state.pa.us/ECMS/ecms_training_calendar.nsf

Questions about this course and enrollment should be directed to: RA-PDHighAdminTrain@pa.gov
Thursday, July 17, 2014 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)


TOUR
Building Community Relationships: Exploring Chester County Preservation Success Stories (8 remaining)  (details)
Building Community Relationships: Exploring Chester County Preservation Success Stories

Chester County, Pennsylvania has a thriving and active network of commissions, review boards, and nonprofit organizations who work tirelessly to preserve and maintain historic properties in their communities.  One of the keys to the success of their efforts is public education and engagement.  Join representatives of the Chester County Preservation Network and local historical commissions for a tour and discussion of some of the most successful local preservation and interpretation projects.  Tour stops include the recently excavated Continental Powder Works, which supplied gunpowder to Washington’s army during the Revolutionary War, the beautifully rehabbed 1882 Phoenix Iron Works Foundry, and the lovingly restored Frick’s Lock Village, all in northern Chester County.  Tour leaders will not only showcase the historic resources, but share effective strategies for building community awareness and support for preservation in their communities.  This tour includes lunch.

NOTE:  This tour will include walking, so please dress appropriately and take all necessary health precautions to ensure that you have a safe and enjoyable experience.

Photo: The rehabilitated Phoenixville Foundry.  Photo by J. Clear.  Shared under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

Tour Leaders:
Karen Marshall, Heritage Preservation Coordinator, Chester County Planning Commission
Karen Marshall has served as the Chester County Historic Preservation Officer/Heritage Preservation Coordinator since 2006.  She assists municipal historical commission formation and provides continuing technical assistance related to historic preservation, and outreach on historic preservation matters throughout the county.  She is a member of the Brandywine Battlefield Task Force and has served six years as a municipal historic commission member in Kennett Township.

Kim Moretti, East Pikeland Township

Barbara Cohen, Schuylkill River Heritage Center

Dale Frens, AIA, Frens and Frens Architects


Thursday, July 17, 2014 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
$45.00


SESSION

High-Tech Archaeology: Several Examples of Subsurface and LiDAR Imaging from Pennsylvania  (details)

High Tech Archaeology: Several Examples from Pennsylvania
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

More and more archaeologists are relying on new technologies to locate sensitive historic resources. This session will highlight several Pennsylvania projects that included Light Direction and Ranging (LiDAR) imaging, and magnetometer and ground penetrating radar surveys. Highlighted will be research undertaken at a late nineteenth century indigent cemetery, the remains of an early nineteenth century grist mill, and an antebellum freed slave community.

Speakers:
Scott Shaffer, Archaeologist, PennDOT District 2-0
Mr. Shaffer graduated from Kent State University (BA, Anthropology) and the University of Memphis (MA, Applied Anthropology/Public Archaeology). He is a Historic Preservation Specialist with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation covering the North-Central region of the Commonwealth. He has been a professional archaeologist since 1986 specializing in acculturation processes, historic farmstead studies and tribal consultation.

Angela Jalleit-Wentling, Senior Archaeologist, GAI Consultants
Ms. Jalleit-Wentling received her BA from Pennsylvania State University and her MA from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is currently a Senior Archaeologist at GAI Consultants, Inc. in Pittsburgh. Her research interests include GIS-Based Predictive Modeling, LiDAR Analysis, African Diaspora Archaeology, and Landscape Archaeology.

Lee Reheard, PennDOT
Mr. Reheard has worked for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation for the past 13 years doing a variety of jobs, from plowing snow and repairing bridges, to soil analysis and aerial photography. For the past 5 years he has focused on LiDAR scanning of transportation infrastructure (walls, tunnels and highways), disaster areas (landslides and bridge collapses), other miscellaneous jobs (crime scenes and geologic surveys) and now archeological sites.

Add to calendarThursday, July 17, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM (Eastern Time)
Location: Meyerson B-3

SESSION
Planning and Preparing Cultural Resources for Disasters  (details)

Planning and Preparing Cultural Resources for Disasters
AIA CE: 1.5 LU HSW

Experts in the field of historic preservation and disaster planning will discuss the tools that must be in place prior to a catastrophic event in order to be better prepared to deal with the situation and be able to access resources and/or assistance when the worst happens. Discussion will include various opportunities at the Federal and State level, and how these factor into the national framework of emergency response and recovery.  Most forms of disaster related assistance are only available to communities that have incorporated them into local, state or federal planning platforms.  For instance, FEMA offers Hazard Mitigation Grants to States, local governments, Indian tribes, and certain nonprofit organizations to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a disaster declaration.  A long-term strategy is needed to navigate this complicated funding and preparedness landscape to ensure a positive outcome for historic properties.  Learn about tools being developed to help assess recovery capacity at the local and state levels. Learn how to make plans now for your community and to be ready when disaster strikes!

Moderator:
Jennifer Wellock, National Park Service
Jen Wellock is an architectural historian and technical reviewer with the National Park Service’s States, Tribal and Local Plans and Grants Division.  Jennifer has responded for the Department of the Interior under the National Response Framework, a unified response to disasters and emergencies.  In 2011, she was deployed to Birmingham, Alabama to assist in recovery efforts from tornado damage.  Subsequently she assisted those deployed for the Department in New York due to Hurricane Sandy.  Previous to her role at NPS, she was employed at the Virginia Department of Historic Resources as an architectural historian and at the West Virginia State Historic Preservation Office as both the tax credit coordinator and senior structural historian for review and compliance.

Amanda Ciampolillo, Region III Environmental Officer, Federal Emergency Management Agency

Amanda Ciampolillo is assigned as the Regional Environmental Officer in Region III.  Based in Philadelphia since 2009, Amanda serves as the senior technical advisor to all of FEMA’s grant programs, helping to ensure that projects comply with environmental and historic preservation (EHP) laws.  She leads a staff of EHP professionals who perform a variety of compliance tasks for thousands of regional projects per year.  As a Disaster Assistance Employee for three years out of Region I, Amanda spent considerable time traveling the Northeast and the South.  She has worked several large disasters, including Hurricanes Katrina and Ike.  Since coming to Region III, Amanda has been heavily invested in streamlining techniques for both non-disaster and disaster grants.  She served as the EHP Advisor in Pennsylvania for Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee.

Dan Corson, Intergovernmental Services Director, History Colorado
Former city council member Dan Corson, a 40-year Boulder resident, holds both J.D. and M.A. (History) degrees from the University of Colorado, the latter obtained after practicing law for 20 years.  Since 1998 Corson has been employed with the Colorado state historic preservation office supervising state and federal tax credit review, state and federal compliance, and local government programs. Dan’s disaster experience includes participation on behalf of his office in a group about 18 months old known as CAHRA (Cultural and Historic Resources Alliance) which is a coalition of government agencies, museums, archives and libraries that meets regularly to devise and implement programs for mitigation before and recovery following a disaster.  He also worked extensively with FEMA and other federal agencies on a regular basis since the September 2013 Colorado flood.

Joshua Wilks, Grants Manager, National Park Service
Joshua Wilks is a grants manager for the National Park Service with the Cultural Resources Directorate.  He has experience in community development, specializing in the strategic integration of historic preservation within the areas of affordable housing and environmental and cultural resource protection.  Joshua began his career as a local program manager and then statewide program planner for the Waterfronts Florida Partnership Program, a revitalization program modeled after the Main Street Four-Point Approach.  He grew his disaster related experience during the 2004-2005 hurricane season, when every Florida county had disaster declarations.  He also previously worked as a Main Street program manager.  With his construction experience and passion for historic preservation, he has served as a consultant for various historic preservation projects.

Thursday, July 17, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM (Eastern Time)
Location: Ballroom 4 & 5


SESSION
The Past, Present and Future of the Transportation Enhancement Programs, MAP-21 and Transportation Alternatives Program
 (details)
The Past, Present and Future of the Transportation Enhancement Programs, MAP-21 and Transportation Alternatives Program
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

This session will provide an overview of PennDOT’s Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP), a component of the Federal transportation bill, Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century- (MAP-21) that provides funding for preservation projects related to historic transportation facilities.  Learn about the roles that PennDOT’s Cultural Resource staff and the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission play in the TAP process and about best practices gathered from past, present and future historic preservation projects.  The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission will discuss how the TAP Program is administered in Southeastern Pennsylvania and provide sample projects that lead to maintaining and sustaining the historic and cultural resources for the Philadelphia Region.    

Moderator:
Jacqueline Koons-Felion, PennDOT
Jackie Koons-Felion has been with Pennsylvania Department of Transportation for 28 ½ years and with the Bureau of Center for Program Development and Management (BCPDM) since 2005. Coming into BCPDM Jackie took over the Pennsylvania Byways Program with having 10 designated byways and since then the program has grown to a total of 21 designated byways, three of which are National Scenic Byway Designations- Historic National Road, Seaway Trail and the Journey Through Hallowed Ground.  In addition to overseeing the Byways Program, she also manages the Recreational Trails Program with Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and  Natural Resources as well as manages 9 Pennsylvania Transportation Management Associations under the Congestion Management and Air Quality Program: six in the Philadelphia area and three in the Pittsburgh area.

Speakers:
Christopher Metka, PennDOT Transportation Alternatives & Safe Routes to School Program
After graduating with his Master’s Degree in Geo-Environmental Studies from Shippensburg University, Chris began working with PennDOT in 2005. In 2006, Chris became Pennsylvania’s first Safe Routes to School coordinator. Having been with the Safe Routes to School program since its inception, Chris has overseen its development and management, including both the infrastructure and non-infrastructure sides. In 2009, the SRTS program awarded $17 million in infrastructure funds to 30 projects, benefitting nearly 100 schools.  In addition to monitoring the implementation of these projects, Chris has developed and managed two non-infrastructure contracts that have provided numerous resources, training opportunities and funding programs for K-8 schools across the state. 

Ira Beckerman, Ph.D, PennDOT Cultural Resources Unit Chief
Ira Beckerman has been the Cultural Resources Unit Head for the Bureau of Project Delivery at PennDOT since 1998.  Trained as an archaeologist (Ph.D. Anthropology, Penn State, 1986), he has worked as a field archaeologist in Mexico, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania.  His 30 years of transportation experience is split between PennDOT and (previously) the Maryland State Highway Administration.  Dr. Beckerman’s research interests include archaeological predictive modeling, pre-contact Eastern North America, and GIS.  He is a member of the Society for American Archaeology, a former member of the Transportation Research Board’s Archaeology and Historic Preservation Committee, and has served on panels for TRB and American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO).

Monica Harrower, Cultural Resources Professional, PennDOT District 6-0
Monica Harrower is a Cultural Resource Professional with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation District 6-0 and is responsible for the Section 106 review of above-ground historic resources on a diverse portfolio of transportation projects throughout Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties.  She has been with the Department for 14 years. A graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with a Master’s Degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania, she is noted for balancing historic preservation concerns with practical solutions for transportation projects, effectively streamlining the project delivery process, and having a detailed understanding of the Section 106 process.

Cheryl Nagle, Historic Preservation Specialist, PHMC
Cheryl L. Nagle is a Historic Preservation Specialist at the Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Office. She reviews state and federal projects for their effects on above-ground resources for the Central Region of Pennsylvania. She has been with the PHMC-BHP for seven years, and also has worked on context development and the BHP’s Railroads of Pennsylvania and Suburbs of Pennsylvania websites and guidelines. Cheryl has a Bachelor’s Degree in Historic Preservation from Southeast Missouri State University and a Master Degree in American History from West Chester University.

Ryan Gallagher, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission

Ryan currently works in the Office of Project Implementation at the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission in addition to serving as a consultant and extension of the project management unit at PennDOT Engineering District 6-0.  Ryan works as both a project and program manager and has managed several hundred local projects during his tenure at DVRPC.  Ryan facilitates the design approval of construction projects through the Department of Transportation’s development process for locally sponsored projects with various types of federal, state, and private funding.  In addition, he has managed several programs for District 6-0 including the Transportation Enhancements, Home Town Streets, Safe Routes to School, and Pennsylvania Community and Transportation Initiatives Programs.  Ryan is currently managing the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) for PennDOT District 6-0 and for DVRPC.  As part of his program management responsibilities, Ryan continues to facilitate the project development, review, selection, and programming processes for projects associated with local programs in DVRPC’s five County region in PA.  Born and raised in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, Mr. Gallagher attended high school at Cardinal O’Hara and is a two time graduate of Villanova University with both a Bachelors and Masters of Science degree in Civil/Transportation Engineering.


Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Meyerson B-3

SESSION
Using the Right Tool: Preservation in Diverse Communities  (details)

Using the Right Tool: Preservation in Diverse Communities
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

This case study provides insight into the critical need for pubic engagement when developing preservation-related development and design tools. In a rapidly developing socially, ethnically and economically diverse community within the City of Pittsburgh the nomination of a local historic district meant to enhance community design standards was developed ahead of a public participation and education process, creating a great deal of negative response from the community.

Elected officials stepped in and teamed with City planning staff to navigate a solution to provide design guidance while addressing community concerns. Hopefully, a by-product will be the lessening of antagonism created by a lack of public participation planning by a well-intentioned neighborhood group.

Finally, this presentation will illustrate the differences and similarities of local historic district designation versus historic conservation district zoning. The application and benefits of a historic conservation district will be discussed. 

Speakers:
The Honorable R. Daniel Lavelle, Councilman, City of Pittsburgh
R. Daniel Lavelle is the Pittsburgh City Councilperson to District 6, one of 2 minority-majority districts in Pittsburgh. His policy focus is on issues of socio-economic development and sustainability in low-moderate income neighborhoods. He currently serves as Vice Chair on the board of the Urban Redevelopment Authority, and is Chair of City Council’s Land Use & Economic Development Committee. Prior to his elected position in Council, he served as Legislative Aide to former District 6 Councilman Sala Udin and as Chief of Staff to State Representative Jake Wheatley.

Sarah Quinn, Preservation Planner, City of Pittsburgh
Ms. Quinn currently serves as historic preservation planner for the City of Pittsburgh. Prior to her time at the City, she spent nearly 20 years as a cultural resources consultant dealing with Native American and environmental justice concerns. Since returning to her hometown of Pittsburgh, Ms. Quinn has worked in diverse neighborhoods to implement goals identified in the city’s cultural heritage plan.

Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Ballroom 4 & 5


SESSION
Applying the Indigenous Cultural Landscape Concept
 (details)

Applying the Indigenous Cultural Landscape Concept
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

Learn about the Indigenous Cultural Landscape concept as lens to view a regional landscape.  Developed by the Captain John Smith Chesapeake Bay National Historic Trail as a way to offer the perspective of American Indian nations at the time of their first contact with Europeans, the approach seeks to integrate the value of cultural and natural resources. The panel will discuss a new way of looking at the land and the challenges of implementation.

Moderator: 
Brenda Barrett – Editor, Living Landscape Observer

Speakers:
Deanna Beacham, American Indian Program Manager – National Park Service Chesapeake Bay Office

Deanna Beacham (Weapemeoc) is the American Indian Program Manager for the National Park Service’s Chesapeake Bay Office. She has pioneered the concept of the Indigenous Cultural landscape. She serves an American Indian expert and speaker on mid-Atlantic American Indian history, cultures, and contemporary concerns. Previously Deanna served as American Indian Specialist in the Virginia governor’s office for nearly a decade.

Suzanne Copping – Conservation and Partnerships, National Park Service Chesapeake Bay Office  

Suzanne oversees Conservation and Partnerships in the National Park Service's Chesapeake Bay Office in Annapolis.  She previously directed planning and development of the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail, facilitating completion of the management plan and interpretive media to foster learning and recreation opportunities along the 500-mile land and water route.  Her work now includes interpretive media development for the John Smith Chesapeake NHT; and coordination with state and local partners to achieve large landscape conservation and public water access goals along both trails. 

Virginia Busby, Ph.D. 

Dr. Virginia Busby holds a PhD in Anthropology with specializations in archaeology and Native American studies with a focus on the Chesapeake.  In addition to managing cultural, environmental, and land use planning programs for the U.S. Army with an emphasis on cross-program integration, she has served as Executive Assistant for Native American Affairs and archaeologist in the Delaware SHPO office.  She possesses over 15 years of experience in the private sector and currently owns her own environmental, cultural resource, and heritage tourism consultation business.


Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Ballroom 4 & 5

SESSION
Pre-Disaster Survey, Fast and Nimble Response, and Expedited Reviews  (details)
Pre-Disaster Survey, Fast & Nimble Response, and Expedited Reviews
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

If a disaster hit your community tomorrow are you prepared, do you know where your community’s cultural resources are located and how to respond to the varied needs and requirements of the federal and state disaster aid your community might receive? In an ideal world prior to a disaster striking all of a community’s cultural resources would be surveyed, readily available in multiple formats, and regularly updated. Learn what your community should and can be doing now with historic resource surveys and why this data is so critical for federal and state agencies to have access to post disaster. Additionally, hear about how the NJ SHPO was able to spring into action post Hurricane Sandy and perform a fast and effective survey of communities where survey data was out-of-date when the storm struck. Leave with a clear understanding of what you can be doing now to identify your community’s historic resources and why survey data is so critical post disaster.

Speakers:
Ashley Bechtold, Federal Emergency Management Agency
Ashley Bechtold is a Historic Preservation Specialist working within FEMA’s Office of Environmental and Historic Preservation in Washington DC. Before coming to FEMA Headquarters, Ashley spent time working in FEMA’s Region 6 Office supporting multiple disasters in Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arkansas. Ashley began working for FEMA during Hurricane Ike and had the unique opportunity to be engaged in the preservation field and disaster recovery of Galveston, Texas. Prior to working at FEMA, Ashley received a degree in Historic Preservation from Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia.

Kinney Clark, New Jersey Historic Preservation Office
Kinney Clark is a Geographic Information Systems Specialist with the New Jersey State Historic Preservation Office coordinating cultural resources GIS development and other information management initiatives for cultural resources related data. Mr. Clark has been extensively involved in HPO’s response to Superstorm Sandy across a variety of program areas. In addition, he administers HPO’s annual federal funding process, and participates project development and data coordination for New Jerseys' Certified Local Government sub-grant program. He previously worked with the HPO's Transportation Unit, providing historic preservation review and technical assistance under a variety of federal and state programs.

Jonathan Kinney, New Jersey Historic Preservation Office
Jonathan Kinney is a Senior Historic Preservation Specialist with the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (HPO) and has been with the office since 2007.  Jonathan’s primary role at the HPO is the review of various undertakings pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the New Jersey Register of Historic Places Act, and a number of other regulatory processes.  Jonathan works closely with federal and state agencies, including the Federal Highway Administration, United States Department of Defense, United States Department of Homeland Security, New Jersey Department of Transportation, and county and local governments, to assist them in meeting their regulatory obligations while balancing the goals of the project and the protection and preservation of New Jersey’s historic architectural and archaeological resources.  Jonathan is also one of the HPO staff working on Hurricane Sandy related FEMA undertakings and was a member of the HPO team that surveyed large portions of the New Jersey shore in the immediate aftermath of the storm.
Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Meyerson B-3


SESSION
Urban Heritage Corridors: How Layered History Informs Revitalization Efforts
 (details)

Urban Heritage Corridors: How Layered History Informs Revitalization Efforts
AIA CE: 1.5 LU HSW

For over a decade, community developers have been moving from a need-based approach for revitalization towards an asset-based approach. The thought being residents are more positive stakeholders in a community with leveraged assets not one full of needs. Historic preservation is part of this approach. Cities are layered with multi-faceted fabric stitched together by waves of settlement, various industries, and varied transit infrastructure. Session participates will learn about urban heritage corridors in Philadelphia like Woodland Avenue and its connection to the Washington–Rochambeau Revolutionary Route (W3R); Lancaster Avenue and its connection to the Lincoln Highway; and the Tacony neighborhood, shaped by industrialist Henry Disston.

Moderator:
James Wright, Commercial Corridor Manager at People’s Emergency Center Community Development Corporation (PEC)
James Wright is the Commercial Corridor Manager at PEC. In this role, James works with businesses on Lancaster Avenue, a heritage main street in West Philadelphia, to help them improve facades, develop sustainable business models, access funding and resources for their business. Prior to PEC, James worked with New Kensington Community Development Corporation (NKCDC) as the Real Estate Development Coordinator. In this role, James did economic development work on Frankford Avenue, a heritage main street in the Fishtown and East Kensington section of Philadelphia.

Panelists:
Kira Strong, Vice President for Community and Economic Development at PEC
Kira Strong is the Vice President for Community and Economic Development at PEC. Kira spearheads the revitalization effort in the communities located along Lancaster Avenue in West Philadelphia. Specifically, Kira oversees the effort to revitalize Hawthorne Hall, historic social hall and major contributor to the Powelton Village Historic District. Prior to her current role, she was the senior project manager at PEC, overseeing the renovation and/or creation of almost 200 housing units in this historic area.

Patrick Hauck, Director of Neighborhood Preservation Programs, Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia

Patrick Hauck became the Director of Neighborhood Preservation Programs for the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia in July of 2005. With over 30 years experience working in historic preservation, the arts and community development, his background includes work in the public, private sectors as well as national and statewide non-profit organizations including the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana.  Mr. Hauck’s background incorporates a broad variety of experiences including preservation education and advocacy, organizational development, historic commercial corridor revitalization, hands-on construction and restoration. In his current capacity Patrick enjoys the opportunity to build the capacity and outreach of the Alliance within Philadelphia’s neighborhoods and to make the mission of the organization even more meaningful to the grassroots community.  


Alex Balloon, Tacony Community Development Corporation, Philadelphia
Alex Balloon is the manager of the Tacony Community Development Corporation located in Northeast Philadelphia. He has been with the CDC since 2011 when he helped launch the commercial corridor program and became its first employee.  Prior to joining the Tacony CDC Alex worked for a consulting firm specializing in downtown and commercial corridor revitalization. He was recognized as a rising star by PACDC in 2012.

Scott W. Maits, Chief Planner, Philadelphia Trolley Coalition
Scott W Maits is a former Vice President of the Delaware Valley Association of Rail Passengers and the Chief Planner of the Philadelphia Trolley Coalition. Scott is a historian and advocate that has had a lifelong fascination with transportation and land use issues. He believes the past informs the best futurists. In his work, he assists multiple community groups, advises and comments on major projects throughout the East Coast of the United States. One of his projects has been to develop a plan to revitalize urban communities through using the old Historic Lincoln Highway to pull together a Multimodal Heritage Corridor- Eastern Gateway to Lincoln Highway.


Thursday, July 17, 2014 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Ballroom 4 & 5

SESSION
Crossing Into History: Compatible Bridge Design in Historic Districts  (details)

Crossing Into History: Compatible Bridge Design in Historic Districts
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

Bridges are not always mere conduits for transportation, but can play important roles in shaping, or affecting, the identity of a place.  While some bridges are small and unnoticeable, others are visual representations of a particular period in time and important elements of historic settings.  What happens when a bridge in an historic setting cannot be rehabilitated?   How do you design a new bridge that is compatible with the setting but does not end up looking historicized?  Is it better to design a bridge that is modern and does not attempt to imitate history or is it possible to develop compatible new designs that reflect their setting.  This session will explore these issues and offer insight into appropriate context sensitive design.

Moderator:
Monica Harrower, Cultural Resources Professional, PennDOT District 6-0
Monica Harrower is a Cultural Resource Professional with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation District 6-0 and is responsible for the Section 106 review of above-ground historic resources on a diverse portfolio of transportation projects throughout Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties.  She has been with the Department for 14 years. A graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with a Master’s Degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania, she is noted for balancing historic preservation concerns with practical solutions for transportation projects, effectively streamlining the project delivery process, and having a detailed understanding of the Section 106 process.

Speakers:
Michael Cuddy, Principal, TranSystems
Michael J. Cuddy, P.E. is a Principal/Senior Vice President with TranSystems and Entity Manager responsible for the firm’s transportation work throughout Pennsylvania.  He has been with the firm for 30 years and is responsible for many of its major bridge design, rehabilitation and inspection programs, particularly those involving historic bridges and complex structural systems.  He has been the project manager on such notable rehabilitation projects as the Wheeling Suspension Bridge, the oldest existing suspension bridge with a span greater than 1,000' and the University Avenue bascule bridge, designed by noted Philadelphia architect Philip Cret.  A graduate of The University of Pennsylvania, he is a registered professional engineer and is noted for his innovative and practical approach to the evaluation and rehabilitation of historic bridges.

Mary McCahon, Senior Historian, TranSystems
Mary McCahon is a historian who holds a Masters of Architectural History from the University of Virginia School of Architecture.  She has worked with engineers integrating history into the evaluation and rehabilitation of old bridges, initially with Lichtenstein Consulting Engineers and now TranSystems, who bought Lichtenstein in 2007.  She was the principal investigator for AASHTO’s Guidelines for Historic Bridge Rehabilitation and Replacement and is very proud to have been an included contributor to AASHTO’s Bridge Aesthetics Sourcebook for workhorse bridges. She is a member of TRB’s General Structures (Bridges) Committee AFF10 and works to have history and good aesthetics matter and become a routine part of project planning and development.

Barbara Shaffer, Planning and Environmental Specialist, Federal highway Administration
Barbara Shaffer is a Planning and Environmental Specialist with the Pennsylvania Division of the Federal Highway Administration.  She has over 20 years of experience in both the public and private sector.  She has a MA in Anthropology from Penn State and a MA in Historic Preservation from Goucher College.  Ms. Shaffer has previously worked for the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission as a Historic Preservation Specialist, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation as a Cultural Resources Professional, and a private consultant as the Cultural Resources Group Leader.

Dain Gattin, Chief Engineer, Philadelphia Streets Department

Darin Gatti is the Chief Engineer and President of the Board of Surveyors for the Philadelphia Streets Department.  As the Chief Engineer he oversees all bridge design, transportation design, surveying, City Plan changes and federally funded bridge and transportation construction for the Department.  He manages a staff of over 100 engineers, technicians, and surveyors with an annual capital budget of 50 to 70 million dollars for bridge and transportation projects.  He is a graduate of Drexel University and has 32 years of experience in Design and Construction with the Streets Department.

Emanuel Kelly, FAIA, Philadelphia Art Commission
Emanuel Kelly is an architect  and planner practicing in Philadelphia.  Mr. Kelly is co-founder and President of this general-practice architectural firm. He has more than 41 years of experience in the design, documentation and construction of architectural, urban design and planning projects.  He serves on the Philadelphia Art Commission and is a past member of the Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Review Board.

Kaitlin O'Shea, Historic Preservation Specialist, Vermont Agency of Transportation
Kaitlin completed her M.S. Historic Preservation at the University of Vermont and her B.A. Historic Preservation at the University of Mary Washington. She works as a Historic Preservation Specialist in Vermont. Before Vermont, she worked as the Overhills Oral History Project Manager in Fort Bragg, NC.




Thursday, July 17, 2014 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Meyerson B-3


MEETING
NAPC Board Meeting  
Add to calendarThursday, July 17, 2014 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM (Eastern Time)

MEETING
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Business Meeting  
Add to calendarThursday, July 17, 2014 8:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Eastern Time)
Location: Class of 1949 Auditorium, Houston Hall

MEETING
CLG State Coordinators Meeting
 (details)
Bi-annual meeting of State CLG coordinators with NPS personnel to discuss the CLG program nationally. Meet your colleagues from across the country and bring your questions, ideas, and issues. NPS will provide a facilitated discussion and presentation of cutting edge CLG projects from across the country, as well as present future plans for the CLG program.
Thursday, July 17, 2014 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Eastern Time)

Friday July 18  


SPECIAL EVENT
Opening Forum

 (details)

OPENING FORUM

Step into the historic Arch Street United Methodist Church for the Roll Call of the States, guest speakers, and a lively discussion panel about the role of historic places and preservation in the communities of the 21st century.  Come early for a Taste of Pennsylvania snack break hosted by Heritage PA and the state's 12 national and state Heritage Areas.

Discussion Panel
In 2016 the preservation movement will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the signature legislative accomplishment of our field.  While the programs that came out of NHPA have played immeasurable roles in preserving local heritage across the country - and there are many past achievements to celebrate - change is both inevitable and necessary.  If preservation at the local level is to remain relevant and vibrant, we must be prepared to have a conversation about how preservation should look in the future, particularly as more and more people are concerned with making communities livable and sustainable.  

Discussion Moderator: 

Randall Mason, Ph.D., Chair, Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, University of Pennsylvania

Panelists:
Adrian Scott Fine, Director of Advocacy, LA Conservancy
Tom Mayes, Deputy General Counsel, National Trust for Historic Preservation
Inga Saffron, Architecture Critic, Philadelphia Inquirer
Barry Schoch, Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation


Sponsored by:





Add to calendarFriday, July 18, 2014 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Arch Street United Methodist Church

SPECIAL EVENT
Reception at Reading Terminal Market  (details)
Reception
This reception is included for all full conference, speaker, and sponsor registrations.

 
 
 Top photo by Fletcher6, accessed under the Creative Commons Share-Alike License.

Bottom photo by Bruce Andersen accessed under the Creative Commons Share-Alike License.
What's better after a long day of educational sessions and tours than a party?  Join us at the historic Reading Terminal Market for food, drinks, entertainment, and networking in one of Philadelphia's landmark public spaces.  The Market will reopen after hours and market vendors will serve up some Philadelphia favorites, including soft pretzels, cheesesteaks, and Bassett's ice cream especially for FORUM-goers.  Browse some of the market's numerous shops and pick up souvenirs, or simply reconnect with old friends or make some new ones.  The night starts with some special entertainment from a true Philadelphia institution - a Mummer's string band. 

NOTE: Conference attendees may purchase guest tickets for non-registrants in the EXTRAS section of the registration site.  Limit 1 guest ticket per attendee.

Venue sponsored by:

Add to calendarFriday, July 18, 2014 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Reading Terminal Market

SPECIAL EVENT
Preservation Pennsylvania Member Luncheon & Annual Meeting

 (details)
Preservation Pennsylvania Annual Meeting

By ImGz (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia CommonsJoin Preservation Pennsylvania’s Board of Directors and staff for the organization’s Annual Meeting and Luncheon at the Paul Peck Alumni Center at Drexel University.  Guest speaker Caroline Boyce, CAE, Executive Director of the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia, will discuss current issues affecting historic places in and around Philadelphia.  Pre-registration is required.

About the Peck Center
The Paul Peck center began its life as the Centennial National Bank in 1876.  Designed by renowned Philadelphia architect Frank Furness and enlarged in 1899 by Frank Miles Day, the building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and rehabilitated by Drexel University in 2000.  Today the building houses a portion of the Drexel Collection of art and antiques.

Sponsored by:
Janet S. Klein





Friday, July 18, 2014 12:15 PM - 1:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Paul Peck Alumni Center, Drexel University
$50.00


BIKE TOUR
Fairmount Park Bike Tour
 (0 remaining)  (details)

Fairmount Park Bike Tour

This 2 hour bike tour through East and West Fairmount Park, placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, features several significant historic sites and pieces of public art. The tour includes stops at five National Historic Landmarks: the Fairmount Water Works, Boathouse Row, Mount Pleasant, Woodford and Memorial Hall. Highlighting the Schuylkill Villa era of the late 18th and early 19th centuries and the grounds of the 1876 Centennial Exposition, riders will come away with a fresh perspective on the importance and historical context of Philadelphia’s park system.

NOTE: Participants are expected to be comfortable riding on city streets and rolling terrain. The ride is rain or shine.  Registration fee includes bike rental and participants will be asked to sign a rental agreement prior to the start of the tour.  You may bring your own bike and you will be provided directions from the Sheraton to the start location.  There is no discount on the registration fee for bringing your own bike. 

Tour Leader:
Rob Armstrong, Philadelphia Department of Parks & Recreation

Sponsored by

Philadelphia Parks & Recreation

Friday, July 18, 2014 7:30 AM - 9:30 AM (Eastern Time)
$25.00

TOUR
A Tale of Two Cities: Camden and Haddonfield, New Jersey
 (0 remaining)  (details)
A Tale of Two Cities: Camden and Haddonfield, New Jersey

Camden and Haddonfield are neighboring communities just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia in southern New Jersey.  One is a small city that in recent years has become synonymous with disinvestment and high poverty rates.  The other is an affluent suburban town with a thriving commercial district and above-average median household incomes.  Both communities enacted preservation ordinances decades ago, but the varying demographic and socio-economic makeups create unique preservation challenges and opportunities.  So what can these two very different communities teach us about effective local preservation efforts?  As with other local preservation programs that are reaching “maturity”, the experiences of these commissions in dealing with income disparity, the abundance and lack of financial resources, the wax and wane of political support, and an influx of new residents who weren’t around during the “creation” is instructive.  Join the Chairs of the Preservation Commissions in Camden and Haddonfield for a walking tour of each community and discussion about what’s worked, what hasn’t, and what they’re planning to try next.  This tour includes lunch at the historic Indian King Tavern in downtown Haddonfield.  
 

Tour Leaders:
Lee Albright, Chair, Haddonfield Historic Preservation Commission
Paul Schopp, Chair, Camden Historic Preservation Commission

Friday, July 18, 2014 8:30 AM - 1:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Location: Camden and Haddonfield, New Jersey
$35.00

TOUR
New Life for the Reading Viaduct: Experience the Rail Park
 (9 remaining)  (details)
New Life For the Reading Viaduct: Experience the Rail Park

Inspired by New York’s High Line, cities across the U.S. are adapting aging rail infrastructure into linear parks and recreation paths. Here in Philadelphia, engaged citizens, urban planners, architects, horticulturalists, community advocates and public officials are working together to repurpose a three-mile former rail line as public open space running through the heart of the city — the Rail Park.  Spanning more than fifty blocks above and below street level, this corridor traverses several diverse neighborhoods; links some of the City's most highly celebrated arts, cultural, and educational institutions; and stretches from Fairmount Park to the edge of Northern Liberties. Friends of the Rail Park invites you to join us for a street-level tour to explore the Rail Park’s history and inspiring visions for its future.

NOTE:  This is a street-level walking tour, so please dress weather appropriate and take all necessary health precautions to ensure you have a safe and enjoyable experience.  Bus transportation will be provided to the starting point and participants will be encouraged to return via public transit.

Tour Leaders:

Leah Murphy, President, Friends of the Rail Park
Leah Murphy has worked to formalize and advocate for the vision of Friends of the Rail Park since its very early stages as a nonprofit, playing an integral role in the organization's development and now serving as board president. Leah is a Senior Associate with Interface Studio, a Philadelphia-based collaborative urban design and planning consulting firm honored with three National American Planning Association Awards from 2009-2012, as well as the 2013 Emerging Planning & Design Studio National Planning Excellence Award.

Patrick Grossi
Patrick Grossi is a public historian committed to accessibility, thinking seriously about non-traditional methods of engaging the past, and making every effort to allow audiences to place themselves within the historical context of the cities and spaces they inhabit. He has previously worked with the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent, Wyck Historic House and Garden, the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. This year Grossi is serving as Project Manager of Temple Contemporary’s Funeral for a Home and Historical Consultant to University of the Arts/DesignPhiladelphia’s ongoing preservation initiative, Gray Area 3.


Friday, July 18, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM (Eastern Time)
$25.00

TOUR
Road Trip: Historic Bridges of Philadelphia (4 remaining)  (details)

Road Trip: Historic Bridges of Philadelphia

With rivers on two sides and creeks, highways, and railroads crisscrossing the city, Philadelphia is home to many impressive and iconic bridges.  Join bridge engineers from TranSystems and PennDOT cultural resources staff for a discussion of the historical and engineering significance of several of the city’s historic spans.  The tour will include a boxed lunch and stops at various locations to provide optimal viewing and discussion opportunities.  Anticipated stops include the 1697 Frankford Avenue masonry arch bridge, the oldest crossing in the Commonwealth, the Strawberry Mansion Bridge, the Thomas Mill Covered Bridge, and Paul Cret’s 1922 masterpiece, the Benjamin Franklin Bridge.  We will also view other bridges along the way.


Tour Leaders:
Michael Cuddy, PE, Principal, TranSystems
Michael J. Cuddy, P.E. is a Principal/Senior Vice President with TranSystems and Entity Manager responsible for the firm’s transportation work throughout Pennsylvania.  He has been with the firm for 30 years and is responsible for many of its major bridge design, rehabilitation and inspection programs, particularly those involving historic bridges and complex structural systems.  He has been the project manager on such notable rehabilitation projects as the Wheeling Suspension Bridge, the oldest existing suspension bridge with a span greater than 1,000' and the University Avenue bascule bridge, designed by noted Philadelphia architect Philip Cret.  A graduate of The University of Pennsylvania, he is a registered professional engineer and is noted for his innovative and practical approach to the evaluation and rehabilitation of historic bridges.

Monica Harrower, Cultural Resources Professional, PennDOT District 6-0
Monica Harrower is a Cultural Resource Professional with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation District 6-0 and is responsible for the Section 106 review of above-ground historic resources on a diverse portfolio of transportation projects throughout Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties.  She has been with the Department for 14 years. A graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with a Master’s Degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania, she is noted for balancing historic preservation concerns with practical solutions for transportation projects, effectively streamlining the project delivery process, and having a detailed understanding of the Section 106 process.


Friday, July 18, 2014 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM (Eastern Time)
$35.00


WORKSHOP
PennDOT Section 106 Training
 (details)
Section 106 Principles and Practice
2 Day Workshop - Thursday July 17 and Friday July 18, 8:30AM-4:30PM

This workshop addresses compliance with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act plus an in-depth analysis of key issues such as tribal consultation, coordination with the National Environmental Policy Act, using agreement documents, and strategies for avoiding common problems.

Note:  This workshop is intended for PennDOT staff and business partners.  Registration is available only through the PennDOT Training Calendar at http://www.dotdom1.state.pa.us/ECMS/ecms_training_calendar.nsf

Questions about this course and enrollment should be directed to: RA-PDHighAdminTrain@pa.gov
Friday, July 18, 2014 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)


SESSION
Advocacy 101  (details)

Advocacy 101
AIA CE: 1.5 LU

This session will explain the most effective ways to conduct advocacy at the federal, state and local level.  It will include a group discussion on developing a message, organizing efforts and effectively advocating for issues.  Too often people feel nervous or not educated enough on an issue to contact their elected officials.  Learn the tips for overcoming those fears so you can get what you want.    

Speakers:

Andrew Heath, Executive Director, Pennsylvania Growing Greener Coalition
Andrew Heath has served as executive director of Pennsylvania’s Growing Greener Coalition since 2010 and brings a wealth of leadership experience – both in the public and private sectors — to the organization.  Under Andrew’s leadership, the Growing Greener Coalition has grown to become Pennsylvania’s largest coalition of conservation, recreation and historic preservation organizations. Recently, the Coalition has led successful campaigns to ensure preservation funding in Act 13 and protect Keystone ’93 from being eliminated in the 2012-2013 state budget. The Coalition was also instrumental in halting legislation (HB2224) that would have radically changed Pennsylvania law, facilitating the sale of parks by local governments.

Elizabeth Hebron, Deputy Director, National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers
Elizabeth Hebron has been the Deputy Director of NCSHPO, the professional association of the State government officials who carry out the national historic preservation program as delegates of the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.  Prior to her current position, Elizabeth served as NCSHPO's Government Relations Director from 2007 to 2013 and Legislative Assistant for U.S. Senator Mike Dewine from 2002-2006.
Friday, July 18, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM (Eastern Time)
Location: University

SESSION
Building Code Application for Historic Buildings  (details)

Applying Building Codes to Historic Buildings
1.5 AIA LU

Do you know the difference between the Prescriptive, Work Area and Performance methods of code compliance?  How about the difference between Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 alterations?  If not, immerse yourself in the International Existing Building Code during this session and eliminate the mystery of how building codes will impact your next project.  The session will include simple case studies and highlight the special advantages available only for historic buildings.

Speaker:
Theodore L. Vedock, AIA, Principal, Hammel Associates Architects
Ted Vedock is a Principal with Hammel Associates Architects, LLC, Lancaster, PA.  The firm specializes in design and specifications for historic preservation, restoration, adaptive reuse, additions and urban infill projects throughout the region. Ted is a registered architect, LEED Accredited Professional and has led educational sessions at previous Preservation Pennsylvania conferences.



Friday, July 18, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM (Eastern Time)
Location: Meyerson B-1

SESSION
Main Street Modernism: Recognizing the Significance of Postwar Commercial Buildings  (details)

Main Street Modernism: Recognizing the Significance of Postwar Commercial Buildings
AIA CE: 1.5 LU | AICP: 1.5 CM

In the decades following the Great Depression and World War II, architects and entrepreneurs reinvented the look of Main Street.  Midcentury modern shops, banks and cafes are an important, if often overlooked, part of our architectural and cultural legacy, representing the apex of postwar consumer culture and space-age optimism.  Today, these vernacular landmarks also represent unique challenges and opportunities for preservationists, business owners, and planners looking to sustain and reinvigorate healthy commercial corridors.  This session will include a primer on character-defining features and materials common in midcentury commercial architecture, from neon signs and arcade fronts to porcelain enamel and Vitrolite.  Session panelists will share case studies describing the process of identifying, researching, and advocating for the preservation of these modern gems.

Moderator:
Ben Leech, Director of Advocacy, Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia

Ben Leech is Director of Advocacy for the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia, an organization that closely monitors preservation issues throughout the region. He coordinates the Alliance’s Mid‐Century Modern Architectural Resources Survey, an ongoing project to document and record Philadelphia’s largely overlooked collection of postwar buildings.


Speakers:
Beige Berryman, AICP, Planner, Philadelphia City Planning Commission
Beige Berryman is a city planner in the Urban Design Division of the Philadelphia City Planning Commission. In March 2014, the City of Philadelphia is expected to adopt the Central Northeast District Plan for an area of the city containing a high concentration of vernacular postwar commercial buildings and corridors. Berryman will discuss the plan’s findings and proposed strategies for preserving and promoting these resources.

Anthony Rubano, Project Designer, Illinois Historic Preservation Agency
Anthony Rubano is a Project Designer at the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. He reviews proposed changes to historic Illinois properties under a variety of state and national programs, and he has consulted across the country on historic preservation and downtown design issues. He has worked extensively with the Illinois Main Street Program within IHPA, where he has provided architectural services to almost 70 historic Main Street communities throughout the State. His presentation explores how Main Street’s architecture evolved in the mid 20th century and looks at examples from communities that have made it a priority to preserve and market their more recent history. Included is an introduction to the “anatomy” of midcentury commercial design, highlighting common character‐defining features and styles.

William Whitaker, Curator, University of Pennsylvania Architectural Archives
Bill Whitaker is the curator and collections manager of The Architectural Archives of the University of Pennsylvania, a position he has held since 1997. He is responsible for directing one of the most significant collections of design records in the world, a collection that includes the archives of Louis I. Kahn (1901‐1974), Lawrence Halprin (1916‐2009), Robert Venturi (b. 1925), and Denise Scott Brown (b. 1931), among others. Whitaker is the president of the Philadelphia Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, a position he has held since 2006. His presentation will highlight some of the lesser‐known but significant architects who designed many of the postwar storefronts, banks and other commercial buildings still found in Philadelphia and its surrounding suburbs.


Friday, July 18, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM (Eastern Time)
Location: Ballroom 4 & 5

SESSION
106 Success Stories: Compliance Archaeology In Your Community
 (details)
106 Success Stories: Publicly-Funded Archaeology In Your Community
AIA CE: 3 LU

This pair of 90 minute sessions documents the revolution in our understanding of American prehistory and history resulting from nearly a half century of Section 106 archaeology.  It will also provide community leaders, preservationists, and planners with case examples, best practices and advice to help ensure that 106 projects in their communities serve the public interest. 

Moderator:

Wade Cattts, Associate Director of Cultural Resources, John Milner Associates
Wade Catts is an Associate Director of the Cultural Resources Department at John Milner Associates, responsible for the oversight of cultural resources services in the firm’s West Chester office. He received a master&